Welcome

In the broadest sense, our research focuses on Depression and Anxiety Disorders. In our lab we study attentional and memory biases in the processing of emotional information, neural substrates of emotional dysfunction in depression and anxiety using fMRI, and cognitive and biological mechanisms that underlie the intergenerational transmission of risk for different types of psychopathology. More »

Information-Processing Biases in Depression and Anxiety

Children and adults diagnosed with clinical depression or anxiety have been found to exhibit biases in their processing of emotional information, particularly when they are in the midst of a significant episode of the disorder. More »

Intergenerational Transmission of Depression and the Prevention of Psychopathology

Having parents with depressive or anxiety disorders increases the risk of these disorders in children and adolescents. The mechanisms by which this risk is transmitted from parent to child, however, are not well understood. In our lab we are examining a large number of biological, cognitive, and social factors in the young children of mothers who have experienced depression or anxiety. More »

fMRI and the Neural Bases of Depression and Anxiety

A growing body of research is demonstrating that depressed and anxious people differ from their non-disordered peers both in the volume of specific brain structures and in their patterns of neural activation as they process emotional stimuli. More »

Early Life Stress, Puberty, and Neural Trajectories

Early life stress is a significant risk factor for the development of psychiatric symptoms that cut across diagnostic categories. The mechanisms through which ELS confers this heightened vulnerability, however, are poorly understood. More »

 

Welcome

Our lab is located in the Department of Psychology on the first floor of Jordan Hall in the Main Quad at Stanford.

In the broadest sense, our research focuses on Depression and Anxiety Disorders. In our lab we study attentional and memory biases in the processing of emotional information, neural substrates of emotional dysfunction in depression and anxiety using fMRI, and cognitive and biological mechanisms that underlie the intergenerational transmission of risk for different types of psychopathology.

If you would like more information about us and our work beyond that which the website provides, feel free to contact us via email at:

snaplab@stanford.edu

We hope you enjoy the site.